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How long can a cat stay in a crate

How long can a cat stay in a crate


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How long can a cat stay in a crate for the sake of it?

Q: How long can a cat stay in a crate for the sake of it? I was thinking about buying a young kitten for my daughter, but I read somewhere (I forgot where) that this is cruel for cats. My cat doesn't like being in crates. He's very playful and has a lot of energy, but also gets easily bored and restless. As far as I can tell, he's not a social cat. (He's had two owners, both of which left him in a cage in the house. He is very lovable.) Should I try to get a crate to just shut him in for the day?

Also, the cage I currently have him in is not very large at all. The only space I can put my hands in is the top of the crate. The rest of the crate is pretty tight.

Thanks for any input!

A: Your description of your cat does sound like this guy needs a social life and that he doesn't like being alone. To be fr, I am a cat lover so I can understand where you are coming from and I do not like to think of my pets as "solitary animals". My mother rsed my sister and myself and this is the way she rsed us and so this is the way I rsed my two kitties. I think it is cruel to keep them from interacting with the other members of their families and I have a hard time keeping my cat in her cage all day long. My experience is that my cat would be miserable and you will not be able to enjoy your child's company while you have a cat in a cage. You say that your cat is playful and gets easily bored and restless, but does he get this same way when you let him out of the cage? You say that you have two previous owners who left him in a cage, but he does not know what it is to live with others. When you are interacting with your son, do you have the impression that he gets lonely when you leave and that he enjoys the attention? My suggestion would be to let him be with you and his sister during your son's nap. My cats do this. If you want to socialize him with the other members of the family (not just your son) try to figure out what it is about your lifestyle that makes you unable to let your cat out of the cage and what you can do to address that. But if you are worried about what it will do to your son when he comes down to your room to say goodnight, then do not get rid of the cat, but make it very clear that your son can visit the cat but is not to keep him there or play with him. You do not have to have an open interaction, he can go into your room and sit on the bed and you can pat him and hold him, but you cannot pet or play with him. He might do better in another room, one that is not near your son's room. Or he could stay in the cage and get exercise. The cage will also get him used to being in an enclosed space, which will not be the case if he's with you all the time. But it might get lonely for him, so maybe consider keeping the cage open just part of the time. But your question about the behavior of other cats is an excellent one. Many people feel that if the cat has a good relationship with the other cat, it will be fine with other cats, even if the cat is older. The problem is that you do not know what the other cat is like. Sometimes the older cat will try to dominate the younger cat and sometimes he will go through a period of indifference, or just be a pushover. Do you know anything about the other cat?

In any case, when your son wants to play with the cat, it's a good idea to put on a muzzle, like a snub nose, so that the cat cannot bite him. If it doesn't work, try to convince your son that the cat can't play with him, but if you let him spend time with the cat, maybe you can be responsible for the cat's safety.

I'm an adult, have had my dog (bichon frise) for 7 yrs now, we love each other, she's a big girl.

But her new boy friend (a chihuahua) has to have control, if she gets to much of it and comes in his eyes, or if she starts to get scared, they chase after each other, she bites him, he jumps on her and they play, it's cute. (in other words, it's normal).

I don't want her to lose this time together, I know we don't have much, but I like her to have it, she's not stupid, she knows it's a little game, they chase and chase after each other and she likes it.

I know if she gets to much and starts to play out of control, then we have to say bye.

I understand it's not always as easy as just keeping them apart, but if the dog can be put in a room and they can't come out together for a while, we can't have this.

I know I'm asking a lot but if anyone has any answers, I'd appreciate it.

I have seen a lot of people on here saying the dog should be the one to end the relationship.

But really, if it's that serious, why keep them together? The little one gets scared and just acts out? Just take him away from the dog for a few minutes and the dog will calm down. I think that if you were really serious about separating them that you shouldn't be having a puppy, at all, because at that age they are still learning to control themselves. Then the dog has control and when she has her own puppy, it won't be that much of a problem. Just my two cents.

Good luck

Last edited by gator, 03-17-2012 at 11:55 PM.

Reason: I have to be up in 8 hours

They play, chase, growl, snarl, then finally run away to another corner where they play some more. At first she was just excited and it was cute, but then she starts getting more and more into it, biting and pushing, then finally jumping on me and grabbing my clothes. Then the game begins, in her eyes...

They play, chase, growl, snarl, then finally run away to another corner where they play some more. At first she was just excited and it was cute, but then she starts getting more and more into it, biting and pushing, then finally jumping on me and grabbing my clothes. Then the game begins, in her eyes...

And your saying that is fine?

If it's a young puppy and the behavior is something you don't want or need to deal with then I would remove the puppy. It's that simple.

Good luck

That's the thing about those two. They are both hyper. The dog doesn't seem to know her place. The puppy does.

Yeah, and I just don't think I could deal with this. I have had some dogs in the past, and one of them had a severe anxiety reaction to a lot of things and he would never play, just sit there, afrd. There was never anything wrong with him.

I just don't think I could do it. It's not that I don't think it's normal. It's that I don't


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