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Salmon poisoning in dogs


Salmon poisoning in dogs and man, by the ingestion of fish contning the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (also called ichthyophthiriasis) has been reported in some areas of the world. Dogs fed rnbow trout contning I. multifiliis, and infected with this parasite, developed histological evidence of an acute inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal mucosa. In the dog, the acute inflammatory response in the duodenum is characterized by the degeneration of the surface epithelial cells and the development of eosinophilic microabscesses in the apical cytoplasm. This acute inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal mucosa of the dog resembles the inflammatory process that occurs in humans during summer and early autumn, when a disease termed fish-scaled dermatitis occurs in humans. Similar inflammatory changes have been found in the mucosa of the upper rways, the urinary tract, and the genital mucosa. The mucosal changes are characterized by intraepithelial granulomas and eosinophilic microabscesses. In this report, the histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings of a dog with ichthyophthiriasis are described. The histopathological features include ulceration and exfoliation of the mucosal epithelium and eosinophilic microabscesses in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. The inflammatory response of the dog was found to be different from that found in the human, as only eosinophils were found in the mucosa, and no granulomas were seen. Immunohistochemical examination using monoclonal antibodies to the eosinophilic granulocyte demonstrated that this cell population represented up to 85% of the inflammatory cells in the lesion. Ultrastructural studies showed that the eosinophilic microabscesses were composed of three types of eosinophilic granules: 1) a crystalloid structure with fibrillar centers, 2) an eosinophilic body contning an electron-dense material, and 3) an electron-dense granule. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophils in the intestinal mucosa of the dog resembled those found in human ichthyophthiriasis. These findings support the hypothesis that I. multifiliis is the causative agent of ichthyophthiriasis in dogs, and may be an etiologic factor in the summer and early fall in humans.

Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is an obligatory parasitic ciliated protozoon that causes ichthyophthiriasis, an emerging and widely distributed disease of freshwater fish. The disease is also known to infect man and dogs. The ichthyophthiriasis in dogs is characterized histologically by a mononuclear and granulomatous inflammatory response, mnly in the gastrointestinal mucosa, with ulceration and exfoliation of the epithelial cells and eosinophilic microabscesses in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these histopathological features of ichthyophthiriasis remn unclear.

Salmon poisoning in dogs and man, by the ingestion of fish contning the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (also called ichthyophthiriasis) has been reported in some areas of the world. Dogs fed rnbow trout contning I. multifiliis, and infected with this parasite, developed histological evidence of an acute inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal mucosa. In the dog, the acute inflammatory response in the duodenum is characterized by the degeneration of the surface epithelial cells and the development of eosinophilic microabscesses in the apical cytoplasm. This acute inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal mucosa of the dog resembles the inflammatory process that occurs in humans during summer and early autumn, when a disease termed fish-scaled dermatitis occurs in humans. Similar inflammatory changes have been found in the mucosa of the upper rways, the urinary tract, and the genital mucosa. The mucosal changes are characterized by intraepithelial granulomas and eosinophilic microabscesses. In this report, the histopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings of a dog with ichthyophthiriasis are described. The histopathological features include ulceration and exfoliation of the mucosal epithelium and eosinophilic microabscesses in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. The inflammatory response of the dog was found to be different from that found in the human, as only eosinophils were found in the mucosa, and no granulomas were seen. Immunohistochemical examination using monoclonal antibodies to the eosinophilic granulocyte demonstrated that this cell population represented up to 85% of the inflammatory cells in the lesion. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophilic microabscesses were composed of three types of eosinophilic granules: 1) a crystalloid structure with fibrillar centers, 2) an eosinophilic body contning an electron-dense material, and 3) an electron-dense granule. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophils in the intestinal mucosa of the dog resembled those found in human ichthyophthiriasis. These findings support the hypothesis that I. multifiliis is the causative agent of ichthyophthiriasis in dogs, and may be an etiologic factor in the summer and early fall in humans.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A 7-year-old spayed female crossbred Labrador retriever was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of Illinois with diarrhea, weight loss, and vomiting. The dog was adopted from a humane society. The owner indicated that the dog had been fed raw meat, had access to the pond, and lived in the home for most of her life


Watch the video: Salmon Poisoning in a Dog (January 2022).

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