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Is paprika bad for dogs

Is paprika bad for dogs



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Is paprika bad for dogs?

I keep hearing that adding some paprika to the food is good for dogs, and that eating the stuff is bad. Is that true? I always heard from my vet that the stuff was poisonous, but he did not say anything about being bad for your dog.

It doesn't do anything to their metabolism, it doesn't do anything to their kidney, liver, or whatever else. It just gives a bit of a kick to their system, and some dogs just love it. We have an old dog who enjoys eating his food with the paprika in it (it really helps to get it down for him) so I can't say anything for sure. But as far as I know it doesn't do anything harmful.

If you buy the cheap stuff that's been through a canning process, then yes, the potassium carbonate in the paprika (or whatever) ends up in the food. It is a diuretic and that is one of the few reasons you might want to limit or cut down on your dog's food. Paprika also contains a substance called capsicin. (Look at the ingredients when buying it, they should be listed, if not in alphabetical order, then chronologically.) Anecdotal evidence is that it can cause "hot spots" on dogs' skin when too much of it is consumed. I don't know that much about it, I just know what the ingredients are.

Anecdotal evidence is that it can cause "hot spots" on dogs' skin when too much of it is consumed. I don't know that much about it, I just know what the ingredients are.

Oh, I didn't mean that as an anecdotal statement. Just some of the stuff I've heard. I read somewhere that there's no proven evidence that dogs would be hurt by eating it.

But I didn't want to confuse the OP if that is incorrect, I was just mentioning something I'd heard.

Anecdotal evidence is that it can cause "hot spots" on dogs' skin when too much of it is consumed. I don't know that much about it, I just know what the ingredients are.

Oh, I didn't mean that as an anecdotal statement. Just some of the stuff I've heard. I read somewhere that there's no proven evidence that dogs would be hurt by eating it.

But I didn't want to confuse the OP if that is incorrect, I was just mentioning something I'd heard.

Oh I see, well then I have not much more to add to my "what to do" post (I thought I did) except to emphasize the "eat as much as you want" part. The potassium is in the red pepper and a small amount goes through the canning process, it does not go through the food itself (as far as I know, correct me if I am wrong). And the pepper itself is also a good source of vitamins and minerals, especially potassium.

As far as the issue of hot spots on the skin I have heard that it is due to the red pepper powder. I am sure you don't want to do anything that will cause a problem for your dog, so I would definitely try not to consume any hot red peppers, they can burn the skin!

Also the vitamin C is a good supplement, especially if you live near a fruit market. Just remember to not make it into a daily staple and watch your caloric intake.

Thanks for your thoughts on the topic, I never thought about adding red pepper to meat dishes. Just always thought about it as a salad topping or as a salsa or as a side to my burritos, which by the way were never bad for your dog!

"It's all fun and games until you lose a finger!" - Jack

I would also try a small batch of my own beef and chicken jerky for your dog.

I do think that your dog's problem might stem from the sodium in his diet. I have seen the same issue with other dogs that have gotten into foods that are high in sodium. It can make a bad itch worse, especially if you feed a product that has more than 3g of sodium. I would make him something lower in sodium and try switching his diet.

I don't have any answers for you, but you've asked a question that is relevant to me and others with this problem. I would suggest looking into getting your dog's diet checked out.

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